Public Comments for: HB112 - Commercial mobile radio or cellular telephone service providers; Lifeline service.
Last Name: Mead Organization: City Council, City of Staunton, Virginia Locality: City of Staunton

HB1290 | Hayes | Public bodies; security of government databases and data communications. As a member of Staunton City Council I oppose this bill. Time Constraint: 24 hours is not enough time to properly assess the extent of the situation, formulate the best strategy, and speak with staff and other individuals affected.  Definitions: I have serious concerns about the lack of definition of “incident”. Without a definitive definition the term “incident” becomes extremely vague allowing for misinterpretation on what constitutes as an incident that must be reported. Secondly, there is no specific language on what needs to be reported. Once again allowing for misinterpretation of what must be reported.  Reporting: HB1290 requires the public body to report the incident to the State before having the opportunity to discuss the matter with the City's insurance company, provider, or agency of choice. This creates another reporting mandate for public bodies. Before The Virginia Information Technologies Agency, working with state and local stakeholders, should develop and publish guidance concerning the scope and implementation of the required incident reporting.

Last Name: Lilyquist Locality: Arlington

Please support HB 249, which would have the Department of Housing and Community Development adopt U.S. Treasury guidelines for broadband infrastructure grants. This is important because: - using the U.S. Treasury guidelines would expand the number and type of localities (e.g. urban/suburban) that can apply for this once-in-a-lifetime federal investment; - the U.S. Treasury guidelines provide localities more discretion in determining need; - the digital divide is as much urban as it is rural (e.g. a study by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia found that nearly 40% of all students without broadband live in or around Virginia’s cities); - the U.S. Treasury guidelines emphasize giving funds to not-for-profit entities like broadband authorities, cooperatives, and non-profits that will prioritize service and community over profits; - the U.S. Treasury guidelines set a more robust standard for technology and speeds than VATI and urge the deployment of wireline connection directly to the premises using fiber optic cables, which are future proof compared to all other technologies.

Last Name: Gavin Locality: Arlington

Hello Please support this change. There are too many residents of all areas in Virginia (myself included) who do not have access to reliable 100x100 internet due to poor service from legacy providers. Internet is a utility in 2022, and competitive service including participation from the public sector is needed to ensure quality access for all.

Last Name: Siniscal Locality: Arlington

Please support HB 249, which would have the Department of Housing and Community Development adopt U.S. Treasury guidelines for broadband infrastructure grants. This is important because: - using the U.S. Treasury guidelines would expand the number and type of localities (e.g. urban/suburban) that can apply for this once-in-a-lifetime federal investment; - the U.S. Treasury guidelines provide localities more discretion in determining need; - the digital divide is as much urban as it is rural (e.g. a study by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia found that nearly 40% of all students without broadband live in or around Virginia’s cities); - the U.S. Treasury guidelines emphasize giving funds to not-for-profit entities like broadband authorities, cooperatives, and non-profits that will prioritize service and community over profits; - the U.S. Treasury guidelines set a more robust standard for technology and speeds than VATI and urge the deployment of wireline connection directly to the premises using fiber optic cables, which are future proof compared to all other technologies.

End of Comments