Public Comments for: HB340 - High school graduation; multiple pathways to advanced studies diploma, associated diploma seals.
Last Name: Timothy Locality: BRISTOW

Dear Delegates, Regarding HB 340, it is important for all Virginian high school students to have the opportunity to study world languages as part of an advanced diploma. As a teacher in a Cambridge International School with a World Language Program, every day I see the benefits of students learning other languages. It helps students build their critical thinking, language development, and interpersonal skills. HB 340 makes students choose between studying world languages or CTE. The reality is that being multilingual is a skill that benefits everyone. CTE students, as well as all other students, need the 21st Century cross-cultural and language skills that come from learning other languages in addition to English. Students should not have to choose either one or the other, they should be able to study both as part of an advanced diploma. Sincerely, Rebecca Timothy Bristow, VA

Last Name: Davie Locality: Pembroke

As a longtime World Language educator, I would like to express my opposition to this bill. I strongly believe that our students need the multicultural experience and view that is acquired when they take classes in WL. I have had so many students tell me how thankful they were to have these classes and how it made their entry into the workforce with added advantages. Another negative of this bill is that it pits the 2 departments of CTE and WL as opposed to each other, rather than 2 programs that can, do, and should work together to provide the 21st Century skills needed for our students.

Last Name: Johnson-Ward Locality: Midlothian

I oppose HB340. I do not agree that language arts should be interchangeable with Career and Tech education for an advanced diploma. Virginia is number 4 in education because we do require exposure to foreign languages. Let's lift Virginia's students up and continue to be one of the most educated states in the United States. Let's focus on equitable funding, teacher retention and agin buildings.

Last Name: Nicholls Locality: Chesapeake

Please move to report HB344, HB346, HB356, HB789, HB1188, HB221, HB340, HB1125, HB1215, HB988, HB1023, HB1093. Please gently PBI HB486 so that academic merits ONLY decide who gets in.

Last Name: Smith Organization: FLAVA Locality: Chesterfield

Please do not support the changing of the advanced diploma and graduation requirements to not include world languages. In a global world and work force, students need to develop the soft skills of working and learning with others of a diverse background. This includes learning and collaborating with people of different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, communicating and working towards proficiency. Languages cannot be replaced or compared with CTE courses.

Last Name: Scinicariello Organization: Foreign Language Association of Virginia Locality: Henrico, VA

Comments Document

The Foreign Language Association of Virginia opposes HB 340, not because we oppose the creation of alternate curricular paths for students but because the current requirements of the advanced diploma allow for different pathways, including advanced work in Career and Technical Education. Since HB 340 was proposed, numerous parents and teachers have sent examples of students who successfully graduated with an advanced diploma while pursuing CTE courses. One parent wrote, "If a child knows the requirements and what they want to do, they can plan well and get both CTE credits/certifications and the advanced diploma as it stands currently.” That argues for better information and guidance rather than changes in the advanced diploma. In the 21st century, in a Virginia deeply embedded in the global economy in fields ranging from agriculture to national security, all Virginians need the interpersonal and cross-cultural communication skills gained in world language learning. When 2100 U.S. Human Resources departments were surveyed, 93% of the respondents said they value employees able to work effectively across a range of different countries and cultures, 66% identified foreign language skills as part of the hiring process, and 41% reported a hiring preference for multilingual applicants. Virginia needs career-ready global citizens. HB 340 sets up an unnecessary opposition between career and technical education and world languages, which is unacceptable in the modern workplace. The two disciplines must work together to prepare all Virginians for work in this century's economy. World languages and career and technical education are both needed and are not in opposition to each other. The attached infographic illustrates how world language learners develop the skills identified in the Employability Skills Framework for Career and Technical Education. The new Secretary of Education has spoken about the need for an education system that prepares "all Virginians for life, career, and college." Governor Youngkin talks about "restoring high expectations for excellence" in education. Removing components from the advanced studies diploma contracts these goals and lowers expectations for Virginians in high school.

Last Name: Terry Organization: National Federation of Modern Language Teaching Associations (NFMLTA) Locality: Henrico County

Comments Document

Protest against HB 340

Last Name: Trude Organization: FLAVA Locality: Warrenton, VA

On behalf of the Foreign Language Association of Virginia (FLAVA), I am writing to express our overwhelming opposition to HB340. This bill seeks to “[e]stablish a pathway to the advanced studies high school diploma, and an associated diploma seal for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathway, that requires advanced coursework in a career and technical education field but does not require coursework in world language.” While the intent of this bill is to elevate the prestige of career and technical education, Virginia's students need both career readiness and global readiness skills to succeed after high school. It is imperative that we not diminish the important role of world languages in our students' development. If anything, we need more world language study for both advanced and standard diploma students coupled with career and technical courses. HB340 in its current status, requires one curriculum to rival another. But as the world becomes increasingly interconnected, we should continue to encourage the study of world languages in support of Virginia’s profile of a graduate and as a work readiness skill. In addition to eliminating an opportunity for students to develop soft skills that are important to ensuring our students are equipped to be successful in the workforce, HB340 would do students a second grave disservice. Most four-year universities in Virginia require 2-3 years of world language studies to apply for admission. Top-tier schools across the nation require 3-4 years of world language studies for admission. Language study is valued because it develops both global competency and literacy and contributes to soft skills that successful businesses seek in their employees. Not only would this bill prevent many of our students from gaining admission to the four-year universities of their choice, but it would hamper their economic futures. Currently there is a critical need for speakers of world languages in Virginia. A quick search of indeed.com reveals that there are over 6400 open positions for proficient world language speakers of American Sign Language, French, German, and Spanish, which are taught throughout Virginia's public schools. As President of FLAVA, I join my voice with the administrators and employers who understand the economic value and the cognitive benefits of world language study and in opposition to HB340 in its original and revised forms. I hope that you consider our reasoned opposition as you discuss the bill. Let’s set our students up for success in a globally competitive economy by ensuring they possess the linguistic skills and global competence to succeed.

Last Name: Morley Organization: FLAVA Locality: Norfolk

Thank you for taking the time to hear my thoughts on HB340. As everyone knows, with the invention of the Internet and advancements of technology, the world is becoming "smaller", but what many may not know is that about 75% of the world's population does not speak English. Why is this fact important? It shows the importance of being proficient in a World Language. So why should we not have separate pathways for World Language and CTE? Any educator in either of these content areas will tell you that both content work together to make sure our students are work or world- ready. Ensuring that Virginian students need to be work or world-ready has been part of most school districts 5C's for the past few years. In fact the American Council for Teacher of Foreign Languages has an article that is dedicated to how acquiring a World Language helps students to be World-ready. In one article published by ACTFL "Making Languages our Buisness" (2019) states "(there is) a high and growing demand for language skills in the workplace with 9 put of 10 employers surveyed citing a reliance on bilingual employees and 1 in 3 reporting a Language skill gap." There are about 79 career pathways identified in the 16 major career clusters where being proficient in a World Language gives the applicant an advantage. 56% of employers have stated their need for bilingual speakers will increase in the next 5 years, and this was stated in 2019. My eldest daughter currently works for Hamilton Beach in Richmond as a Bilingual consultant. She was given this employment because of her proficiency in French which she gained by attending and graduating amaury High School in Norfolk. Part of the skills employers look for is intercultural and global competence. These skills are achieved in a World Language course. This does not just apply to students who plan to attend college/University, but to all students. In Virginia alone, there are over 800 internationally owned companies. These companies prefer that a potential employee be proficient in a World Language so they do not have to pay to send the employee through Language classes. Virginia ranks 12th in employment from Europe in the U.S. according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Now, imagine if more of our students were hired due to not only the skills they acquire in CTE, but their ability to converse and interact in a World Language. Currently 14,500 Virginia's are hired by companies like Airbus, Andros, and Thales, to name a few French companies. Final thought, by creating separate pathways and separating CTE and World Languages, you are essentially putting one content area against the other. The Math department does not try to outshine the Social Studies department because they both know they are essential in creating a well-educated member of society. World Languages and CTE have worked together to do the same; creating a student who is not only well-educated but also globally competent and ready plus have a cultural understanding and awareness to be empathetic to various situations. These students need to be creative and critical thinkers, problem-solvers and innovators. This is accomplished through the skills they acquire in World Languages and CTE. Last consideration, several states have World Languages as a cor subject and not elective, look how far there students go. World Languages is no longer for traveling abroad, not when it is heard locally. Thank you for your time.

Last Name: Burke Organization: FLAVA Locality: Albemarle

I ask that the House vote against HB-340. As a professional educator and teacher of World Languages, I feel that this bill is undercutting the importance of the study of world languages and it's role in creating well-rounded citizens of the Commonwealth. The creation of two different advanced diplomas, one with world languages included and one without world languages included sets up an opposition between CTE and the interpersonal, cross-cultural skills all Virginians need in the 21st century. In a global economy, all of our citizens need to have a perspective and understanding of other cultures, which can be gained as students in a world language classroom. Students should be asked to engage in both CTE and language study as part of the advanced high school diploma requirements.

Last Name: Kuettner Locality: Lexington

Comments Document

Dear Members of the Education Committees, I ask that you not delete world languages from high school graduation requirements. There is value to language study. See below and in the attached document. Please follow the links to gain more information in those categories of relevance and where information is grounded in research. Please do not shortchange our students. Respectfully, Dick Kuettner Benefits of studying another language - 1. Improves memory – the more you learn new skills, the better your brain functions work. Learning a new language forces you to learn new vocabulary and grammar rules. This trains you brain to remember new words, make connections between them, and use them in contextual situations 2. Enhances multitasking ability – having the ability to think and communicate in different languages helps train multitasking. 3. Improves Attention 4. Improves performance in other academic areas – while learning a language you engage in extracurricular activities in that language, such as communicating with other peers. 5. Develop empathy and compassion – while learning a new language, you are also learning about a new culture. This can lead to thinking in different perspectives and develop understanding for those in that culture. 6. Reduced risk for dementia and Alzheimer’s – the brain creates more neural pathways while learning, keeping it strong a. In a study of more than 200 bilingual and monolingual patients with Alzheimer’s disease, bilingual patients reported showing initial symptoms of the disease at about 77.7 years of age—5.1 years later than the monolingual average of 72.6. Likewise, bilingual patients were diagnosed 4.3 years later than the monolingual patients (80.8 years of age and 76.5 years of age, respectively). 7. Can help math and science - When you learn a language you become used to sorting and processing new information in your target language. Also, there is a correlation between learning a new language and the ability to develop scientific hypotheses. 8.Increased creativity- forces you to think creatively to get you point across, especially if you have a limited vocabulary. 9. Landing jobs – roughly 23% of Americans are bilingual, giving those who are a bilingual a chance to stand out. 10. Improve confidence – the more languages you can speak the more confident you are to put yourself out there. Plus can put you in situations that you never thought you would be in. 11. According to the NIH, millions of Americans use a language other than English in their everyday lives outside of the home, when they are at work or in the classroom. 12. Bilingual people perform better on inhibitory control tests, conflict management, task switching 13. Higher proficiency in a second language, as well as earlier acquisition of that language, correlates with higher gray matter volume in the left inferior parietal cortex 14. Bilingualism positively influences attention and conflict management in infants as young as seven months. a. Navigating a multilingual environment imparts advantages that transfer beyond language. Another useful Link: https://www.actfl.org/center-assessment-research-and-development/what-the-research-shows/cognitive-benefits-students ^ACTFL citations, with papers cited https://www.ostaz.com/english/blog/eu-blogs/benefits-of-learning-a-new-language

Last Name: Staudt Organization: Global Virginia Locality: New Kent County

Comments Document

We have alternative pathways for learning and provisions like 8VA20C-131-110, allowing students to replace the 140 hours seat time for high school credit by taking, and passing state approved assessments. This bill clearly targets the study of World Languages, and is contrary to the recommendations from the US Department of Education, and business organizations. We have data showing that Virginia is experiencing a foreign language skills gap, and that the study of World Languages and Cultures is aligned with the Virginia Profile of a Graduate. The demand for multilingual employees will double in the next five years. 9 out of 10 employers, who took part of a study conducted by the American Council of Teachers for Foreign Languages "Make Languages our Business" (2017) stated that they need bilingual employees. All career clusters have a demonstrated demand for bilingual employees to meet local and global demands. Instead of eliminating the requirement, we ought to expand the offering of foreign language learning. Employees with language skills have higher incomes in comparison to monolingual employees. This bill will be a disservice to the students of our Commonwealth, who not only need to engage in language learning, but also will need 21st Century soft skills, like intercultural competence, creative problem solving, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking. Learning a language develops and strengthens analytical skills, and gives students different insights and perspectives. Having a 21st century, career ready workforce, and a school system that values global competence and world language studies, will attract future investors to consider Virginia, instead of Atlanta or the NC research triangle. This bill is by no means innovative. Quite the contrary! It moves the needle back and forces students on predetermined tracks or learning silos without regard for data and evidence that we need to lead with languages. We strongly oppose this bill.

Last Name: Kuettner Locality: Raphine

Dear Delegates. I ask that you please reconsider HB340, in its revised and previous form, before you take action and move this forward. I ask so for the following reasons: 1. The Bill singles out one discipline in favor of others. 2. Language is the root of communication and is a significant part of our being. 3. Society cannot function without language. 4. Virginia is one state where many languages are spoken because of the diverse communities we have established throughout our history. 5. Not all cultures around the world rely on English language as the main language of communication...no, not even here at home. 6. Language and culture study enhances knowledge of various countries, time-periods, perspectives, and ways of life. 7. Language and culture study improves analytical, critical thinking, and communication skills. 8. If our legislators want us to be more inclusive, more diverse, and more global, how do we do it without world languages to accomplish these goals? 9. If language study is, as I foresee your ambitions, cancelled, you will be shortchanging many Virginia high school students who will not even be able to apply for admission to some of the Commonwealth’s better colleges and universities, which require language for entry. 10. I can vouch first-hand the statistics that state that employers seek potential employees who are beyond being monolingual. Language study and/or fluency is often a deciding point between two good candidates. Paul R. Kuettner

Last Name: Savage Locality: Fairfax County

I support HB 340.

Last Name: Heal Organization: Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce Locality: Norfolk

Providing this type of support and flexibility to educators and students is one of the things we repeatedly hear is needed. Students need to be able to learn and develop in the skills in which they are interested. There are many examples of students who excel outside of the traditional classroom in a career and technical education environment. CTE schools in Chesapeake, Virginia Beach, and on the Peninsula have success stories of students who were not doing well in a traditional classroom environment, but thrived when taking a hands on class about aerospace engineering, nursing, or technology, to name a few. This bill supports the approach of recognizing students strengths and supporting their career interests, and it is a step forward in putting the student first and the Hampton Roads Chamber supports the bill.

Last Name: Fore Organization: VOWLS Locality: Abingdon

On behalf of the Virginia Organization of World Language Supervisors (VOWLS), I am writing to express our overwhelming opposition to HB340. This bill seeks to “[e]stablish a pathway to the advanced studies high school diploma, and an associated diploma seal for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathway, that requires advanced coursework in a career and technical education field but does not require coursework in world language.” While the intent of this bill is to elevate the prestige of career and technical education, Virginia's students need both career readiness and global readiness skills to succeed after high school. It is imperative that we not diminish the important role of world languages in our students' development. If anything, we need more world language study for both advanced and standard diploma students coupled with career and technical courses. HB340 in its current status, requires one curriculum to rival another. But as the world becomes increasingly interconnected, we should continue to encourage the study of world languages in support of Virginia’s profile of a graduate and as a work readiness skill. In 2017, after years of data collection and evaluation of employees, Google found among the most important qualities of their top employees were all soft skills. These skills include, but are not limited to: communicating and listening well, possessing insights in others (including others’ different values and points of view), having empathy toward and being supportive of colleagues, and being able to make connections across complex ideas. Google goes on to report that good team members demonstrate generosity, empathy, emotional intelligence, emotional safety (meaning each team member can feel confident in speaking up and in making mistakes), and can exhibit a curiosity toward the ideas of their teammates. Each of these soft skills are practiced and are an integral part of the world language curriculum, classroom, and community, so much so they have been identified by ACTFL in their World Readiness Standards for Learning Languages. In 2022, The Center for Global Education Asia Society pondered in their article “Global Competence Through Career and Technical Education” how to ensure students are prepared with skills to connect, to compete, and to collaborate in a global economy. And as the world becomes more interconnected with 1 in 5 jobs tied to international trade, how do we prepare students for work and civic roles in an environment where success increasingly requires the ability to work with others from diverse backgrounds in a global market? The Association for Career and Technical Education concluded that critical thinking and problem solving, communication, collaboration, along with creativity and innovation were imperative for work readiness standards. It takes only a glance at Virginia’s Standards of Learning for World Languages to conclude that world language courses are instrumental in supporting students in these areas. In addition to eliminating an opportunity for students to develop soft skills that are important to ensuring our students are equipped to be successful in the workforce, Most four-year universities in Virginia require 2-3 years of world language for admission. Language study is valued because it develops both global competency and literacy and contributes to soft skills that successful businesses seek in their employees. Oppose HB 340.

Last Name: Haines Organization: Global Virginia Locality: Richmond

I am against the passage of VA HB 340 and ask that you oppose this legislation as well. VA HB 340 is misguided legislation and bad policy for the future of our students and workforce. We can do better in educating our students for employability and success in their future. This is an insidious effort to dilute and divest the learning and study of world languages. You should be supporting and advocating for more study and learning of world languages ---not less for all graduation pathways. Eliminating world language study to further the attainment of an advanced diploma does nothing to further Virginia’s prestige as a preeminent leader in education. What is the purpose of an advanced diploma; what is the intended outcome? In all facets, HB 340 misses the mark! Why not cut or eliminate other disciplines of knowledge and learning? Most of us don’t use much math, science, biology, music, or history these days. Why would the future workforce need to know the Pythagoras theory? Why would they need to know about the massacres in Bosnia, much less where is Bosnia? Why would they need to know the difference between meiosis and mitosis? Why would they need to know about covalent bonding? Why would they need to know about the law of gravity? Why would they need to know about the great works of literature and art? The answer is they need to know about all of these; they need to care about them and understand them. I submit that CTE graduates will find themselves in a very diverse, if not the most diverse work environment than almost any other career field. Likely more diverse in all sense of diversity: ethnic, racial, cultural and cognitive than this august chamber. Studies and research indicate that employers across the spectrum want employees with language and intercultural skills –soft skills. The construction sector, healthcare and social assistance/services sector report the highest foreign language skills gap. 39% of employers in the construction sector and nearly 30% in the professional and technical services sector are most likely to be unable to pursue or have lost business in the past three years due to a lack of world language skills in their employee. This is the CTE space! World language study involves perspective taking and sense making; it develops interpersonal skills, intercultural awareness, and empathy. It provides an expanded Weltanschauung to better understand the other –any other! Expanded critical thinking and cognitive clarity are unquestionable outcomes from world language study. Our student’s world is an ever increasingly diverse and complex place and they need the cognitive and critical thinking skills that learning world language and these other disciplines gives them: a well-rounded education.

Last Name: Nicholls Locality: Chesapeake

Please move to report HB221, 340, 533, 873, 1032, 1100, 1125, 1347. Thank you.

Last Name: Delgado-Poust Locality: Fredericksburg

Comments Document

Dear Delegates: The following written feedback relates to HB 340. In the attached letter, you will find my thoughts on the bill, but please find here a summary of the letter itself. In regards to the declaration, “The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing or robotics in lieu of world language courses or any other required course that the Board deems appropriate," it is important to keep in mind that career and technical education is not in opposition to the study or exploration of world languages and cultures; the two disciplines can and should work together to prepare career-ready global citizens. If one of our primary goals as a state—and as educators—is to produce highly skilled, well-rounded, and culturally sensitive individuals who will eventually become strong job candidates (technical or otherwise) who can compete with those of other states or nationalities, this bill must not pass as it is in its current state. As expressed by ACTFL (the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages), learning a second or third language (other than English) in the 21st century is not only beneficial, but necessary for success in life. If we want our students and citizens of the Commonwealth to become integrated in the local and world community and thus able to function in the modern global marketplace, learning another language is an essential component of any education. Language learning has been associated with enhanced problem solving skills, improved verbal and spatial abilities, improved memory function, enhanced creative and flexible thinking capacity, not to mention enhanced tolerance of individuals and groups from other cultures. Thank you for your time and consideration of this feedback. Sincerely, Antonia Delgado-Poust, Ph.D. Fredericksburg, Virginia

Last Name: Scinicariello Organization: Foreign Language Association of Virginia Locality: Henrico

HB 340 is currently before the House Education Committee. I’m commenting as a Virginia voter, a parent, and an educator to ask that you oppose this bill, which clearly aims to eliminate world language courses from the advanced studies diploma. I certainly understand the need to differentiate educational paths for Virginia students based on their talents, interests, and goals. Outlining various curricular paths for students who aspire to the advanced studies high school diploma can serve this goal. However, the original wording of HB 340 unnecessarily prejudges the curriculum that might be established by these new pathways and unfairly targets the world language courses that teach skills--communication and cross-cultural awareness--essential to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. When representatives of the Foreign Language Association of Virginia expressed our concerns to Delegate Davis, he was kind enough to meet with us and gave us his draft of a substitute HB 340. Unfortunately, this bill sets up a direct opposition between world languages and career and technical education by creating an advanced diploma with no world language requirement and another with no career and technical education requirement. This is unacceptable. All Virginians will pursue careers in a multilingual, multicultural society within the global economy. Career and technical education is not in opposition to world languages; the two disciplines can work together to prepare career-ready global citizens. Finally, HB 340 is unnecessary. Since this bill was proposed, parents and teachers have sent numerous examples of students who successfully met the advanced diploma requirements while pursuing career training in CTE programs. One parent wrote “If a child knows the requirements and what they want to do, they can plan well and get both CTE credits/certifications and the advanced diploma as it stands currently.” That argues for better information and guidance rather than changes in the advanced diploma. Governor Youngkin has talked extensively about "reestablishing expectations of excellence" in public education. Lowering the standards for the advanced diploma by taking away any components of the advanced diploma directly contradicts his goal. For all these reasons I ask that you oppose HB 340. Thank you. Sincerely, Sharon Guinn Scinicariello, Ph.D. University of Richmond (retired) Advocacy Chair, Foreign Language Association of Virginia

Last Name: Morley Locality: Norfolk

The study and acquisition of a World Language is vital to the youth of Virginia. Not only does becoming proficient in a language other than English make a person more marketable in the work place but for our students who decide to attend a University, it makes the student more competitive for admittance. The study of 3 or more years shows the student is dedicate, resilent and prepared for a challenge. These students can think critically and creatively, have an understandinh and empathy of various cultures, not to mention have the ability to deliver their message with clarity and detail. All areas and soft skills desired in the work place. Let's look beyond the multitude of skills taught in a World Language class. There are multitude of published and peer reviewed studies in the area of brain health that show a correlation between the study and continued use of a World Language and the delaied on-set of dementia and Alzeheimer's. We tend to say that our students recieve top education in the state of Virginia, but you are now considering taking away the ability for all of the Virginian students to be Globally competitive in a state that has thousands of international and multinational companies who hire bilingual and multilingual Virginians. Therr is also the military installations which welcome fellow military personnel from our allied countrirs and NATO families typically live in Norfolk/Virginia Beach during their station time here in Virginia. My eldest daughter is a graduate of Maury High School in Norfolk. She was fortunate to study French from Monsieur and Madame Bouziane while she was there. She took French her whole high school career. When she began to study to become a teacher at Virginia Wesleyan University, she was able to place in an advance French class and had her minor of French completed by the end of her Fall semester of her Sophomore year. Today, she works for Hamilton Beach in Richmond as a French-speaking consultant and handles calls from all Francophone countries, mostly Canada and France. There are several states where the study of a World Language is a core subject, such as Massachusetts and Louisiana. We want our students to take the world by storm and use every tool they have been taught to make positive changes to the world and community around them. How can they do this when they cannot communicate with 75% of the world? That's right 75% of the world do not speak English or cannot speak English proficiently enough to have a basic conversation. The U.S. is only 4% of the World's population and we need our students to represent that 4% in a matter that will bring effective change in their future. Some may say that there are translation apps and sites that can be used. That's true but those tools do not know the difference of some of the finer nuances in various languages nor understand slang nor idioms of the languge they are trying to communicate in. Besides having to rely on such tools take away from the flow of a conversation as you build a relationship. Our students, all students, need a World Language so they can be challenged, learn to persevere, and interact with a World that is becoming smaller every single day.

Last Name: Trude Locality: Fauquier

I oppose HB 340 with the creation of an advanced diploma without the world language requiremen. World languages are a crucial component to the advanced studies diploma. Language learning reflects the 21st century skills of communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity. Students who study world languages also learn invaluable soft skills, such as interpersonal communication which involves listening and adjusting what you say accordingly ; possessing and understanding different points of view; empathy; critical thinking; and making connections across complex ideas. Recently Google announced that “The seven top characteristics of success at Google are all soft skills: being a good coach; communicating and listening well; possessing insights into others (including others different values and points of view); having empathy toward and being supportive of one’s colleagues; being a good critical thinker and problem solver; and being able to make connections across complex ideas.” (Washington Post). If one of the world’s top tech companies is placing more emphasis on the soft skills, does this not indicate the importance of language learning and the skills that world language educators are instilling in their students on a daily basis? It is not only Google that sees the importance of these soft skills fostered in the language classroom. According to NACE’s Job Outlook 2016 survey, important hirable attributes include “written communication skills, problem-solving skills, verbal communication skills, and a strong work ethic”. By placing a focus on soft skills, as well as 21st century skills, we are preparing language students to be ready for the competitive global society in which we live. In addition to marketability, learning a language has a multitude of other benefits for students. In order for students to be successful in the global society, they need to develop a sense of interculturality. In the language classroom, students learn to understand and appreciate other cultures and how those cultures relate to their own. Students’ perceptions of the world change and they become more understanding of others. Language truly is a product of a culture, and the knowledge that comes with learning different ways of seeing the world is something that we need more of in today's society. HB 340’s current wording unnecessarily prejudges the curriculum that might be established by the new pathways, unfairly targeting courses that teach skills--communication and cross-cultural awareness--of use to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. Virginia graduates are expected to “build connections and value for interaction with diverse communities,” one goal of world languages courses. Moreover, all world languages courses teach students interpersonal and communication skills, essential in any workplace. Because they teach such necessary skills, I oppose any advanced studies high school diploma that does not contain world language components.

Last Name: Ware Locality: Stafford

I am writing to oppose the inclusion of language singling out World Language programs in HB340 and weakening the requirement for world language study in the advanced diploma coursework. The publication _France-Amerique_ reported in 2018 that every US state has a French business operating in it and that in 2017 France was "the third biggest foreign employer" in the US. The same report from the embassy of France in Washington, DC, as commented on by _France-Amerique_, states that 16,500 jobs in Virginia exist because of the presence of French companies. It is crucial to maintain robust language programs in the state of Virginia so that our state can, with the same ease shown by French companies, continue to do business abroad ourselves and create strong links with international business. By grade 8, as far back as the 1980s, students in France were already learning two world languages, with the addition of Latin or Greek as a third language for those aiming for advanced studies. Many of our local middle schools do not offer any world language until grade 8, and then only offer one world language option. It is through universal world language study that France has been in the position to have at least one business in each of our states. All students can learn another language. Best practices in world language instruction are rapidly changing to emphasize proficiency in communicating in the language and to promote the use of authentic language resources. All students should be learning languages long before high school. It is time to strengthen rather than weaken our state's world language education. https://france-amerique.com/en/a-french-company-in-every-u-s-state/ The 2020 report https://frenchtreasuryintheus.org/la-relation-bilaterale/

Last Name: Smith Organization: FLAVA Locality: Chesterfield

Please do not support HB340. Proficiency in World Language(s) is a career skill and essential for adults to live, work and thrive in a diverse world. Languages offer a competitive advantage not only within the job market but with many colleges and universities around the planet. World Languages offer more than simply grammar or words, they offer the development of soft skills in being productive global citizens including culture, problem solving, collaboration and organization. All are valuable, but World Languages cannot be replaced by CTE or IT or coding courses for the high school credit requirement or advanced diploma in that they are completely different skill sets.

Last Name: Aylor Locality: Fauquier County

Dear Committee Members: I am writing to request that the term "in lieu of world language courses" be removed from HB340. It is essential for young people entering the workforce to have the skill of bilingualism . The effectiveness of private businesses and government agencies are minimized by an inability to make international connections. Additionally, world languages uniquely express customs, traditions, values, and history that are not able to be replicated through alternative means. Students should be encouraged to gain proficiency in another language in order to support their cognitive development and communication skills, making them more well-rounded individuals. Virginia must make this a priority for our students - not an alternative.

Last Name: cei Locality: Henrico

I am opposed to eliminating foreign languages as a requirement for advanced studies high school degrees. Foreign languages provide invaluable tools to understand the development of words and thus strengthens vocabulary. Also studying foreign languages makes one appreciates one's own language rules, as well as the culture of other countries. Let us keep this useful discipline in our schools.

Last Name: Carr Locality: Alexandria, VA

Students now more than ever need world languages to compete in the global market place. If they do not have access to this important skill in high school it will be detrimental to them obtaining jobs that require languages in the future. Removing world languages from the advanced diploma will hurt all world language departments all over the state. Students in high school need exposure to world languages and if it is no longer a requirement for at least one diploma, they will be less inclined to enroll. This decision has long term impacts for their economic growth in the future.

Last Name: Little Locality: Chesterfield County

Yes to HB - 340 - (An amendment could include students with disabilities to allow them to focus on their natural strengths and not force them to take courses they would likely fail, so, differentiated special education instruction...) I support HB 340 in the interest of differentiated instruction in order for students to focus on their career goals. Each students' pathway is different, and flexibility in focusing on what they and their parents choose for them is paramount to post secondary education success in their lives and in our communities.

Last Name: Scinicariello Locality: Henrico, VA

HB 340 is currently before the House Education Committee. I’m writing as a Virginia voter, a parent, and an educator to ask that you oppose the wording of this bill, which clearly targets world language courses: “The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing or robotics in lieu of world language courses or any other required course that the Board deems appropriate.” I certainly understand the need to differentiate educational paths for Virginia students based on their talents, interests, and goals. Outlining various curricular paths for students who aspire to the advanced studies high school diploma can serve this goal. However, the wording of HB 340 unnecessarily prejudges the curriculum that might be established by these new pathways and unfairly targets courses that teach skills--communication and cross-cultural awareness--essential to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. When 2100 U.S. Human Resources departments were surveyed, 93% of the respondents said they value employees able to work effectively across a range of different countries and cultures, 66% identified foreign language skills as part of the hiring process, and 41% reported a hiring preference for multilingual applicants. Career and technical education is not in opposition to world languages; the two disciplines can work together to prepare career-ready global citizens. Therefore, I ask that you vote to amend the wording of HB 340 to read ““The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing, robotics, or other courses that the Board deems appropriate.” Thank you. Sincerely, Sharon Scinicariello, Ph.D. University of Richmond (retired)

Last Name: Kuettner Locality: Raphine, Virginia

Dear Delegates. I ask that you please reconsider HB340 before you take action and move this forward. I ask so for the following reasons: 1. The Bill singles out one discipline in favor of others. 2. Language is the root of communication and is a significant part of our being. 3. Society cannot function without language. 4. Virginia is one state where many languages are spoken because of the diverse communities we have established throughout our history. 5. Not all cultures around the world rely on English language as the main language of communication...no, not even here at home. 6. Research shows that language and culture study enhances knowledge of various countries, time-periods, perspectives, and ways of life. 7. Research shows that language and culture study improves analytical, critical thinking, and communication skills. 8. If our legislators want us to be more inclusive, more diverse, and more global, how do we do it without world languages to accomplish these goals? 9. If language study is, as I foresee your ambition, cancelled, you will be shortchanging many Virginia high school students who will not even be able to apply for admission to some of the Commonwealth’s better colleges and universities, which require language for entry. What a disservice! 10. I can vouch first-hand statistics that show that employers seek potential employees who are beyond being monolingual. Language study and/or fluency is often a deciding point when two equally good candidates compete. Thank you for taking these items into consideration. Sincerely, Dr. Paul R. (Dick) Kuettner

Last Name: Trude Organization: FLAVA Locality: Warrenton, VA

As the 2019 ACTFL Language Teacher of the Year finalist, FLAVA (Foreign Language Association of Virginia) President, a world language educator in Loudoun County, and a Virginia resident, I am horrified by House Bill 340 which would “establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing or robotics in lieu of world language courses or any other required course that the Board deems appropriate”. Career and technical education (CTE) classes cannot replace World Language classes. By doing so, you and your fellow legislators are doing a disservice to ALL students in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Furthermore, by allowing the substitution of CTE classes for World Language classes, you would create a system that is not in alignment with the newly approved Virginia Profile of a Graduate. House Bill 340 undermines the career and college readiness of students in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Most colleges and universities in Virginia require several years of world language study and do not allow CTE classes to replace World Language requirements. All students and therefore all college and career pathways (including computer science) need world language instruction to be successful in the job market of the 21st century. In order for students to be successful in the global society, they need to develop a sense of interculturality. In the language classroom, students learn to understand and appreciate other cultures and how those cultures relate to their own. Students’ perceptions of the world change and they become more understanding of others. CTE courses do not afford students any opportunities to develop cultural competence. Language truly is a product of a culture, and the knowledge that comes with learning different ways of seeing the world is something that we need more of in today's society. HB 340’s current wording unnecessarily prejudges the curriculum that might be established by the new pathways, unfairly targeting courses that teach skills--communication and cross-cultural awareness--of use to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. Virginia graduates are expected to “build connections and value for interaction with diverse communities,” one goal of world languages courses. Moreover, all world languages courses teach students interpersonal and communication skills, essential in any workplace. Because they teach such necessary skills, I oppose any advanced studies high school diploma that does not contain world language components. Career and technical education classes should not be a substitute for world language classes for the advanced studies diploma. I respectfully oppose any attempts to substitute CTE classes for language study, which is vigorously and uniformly rejected by those in the career and technical field and world language educators. If House Bill 340 resurfaces for a vote, I urge you to consider these facts and vote against it.

Last Name: Trude Organization: Foreign Language Association of Virginia (FLAVA) Locality: Fauquier County

Comments Document

Please read the attached letter regarding House Bill 340. I oppose the wording of HB 340, as it clearly targets world language courses: “The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing or robotics in lieu of world language courses or any other required course that the Board deems appropriate.” I advocate that the bill be amended to read: “The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing, robotics, or other courses that the Board deems appropriate.” Cordially, Heidi L. Trude FLAVA President

Last Name: Scartelli Sykes Locality: Pulaski County but I work in Radford City

Please do not remove or replace World Languages from the diploma requirements. World languages are required for most four year universities. Changing this would start a domino effect of changes for so many students and their career paths. Any world language can be a wonderful addition to any career. CTE has their own standards and tests for competition to be able to receive a license to work in that field. World Languages and CTE are both equally important but are in two different categories. In addition, world languages teach our students to speak and to speak confidently! These languages are a trade in their own and help our students to learn more about the world around them. Learning a World Language will ALWAYS be a useful tool for any student to have. I should know because I grew up learning both French and Spanish just like the majority of my students.

Last Name: Dudnik Locality: FAIRFAX

Dear Delegate Davis: HB 340 is currently before the House Education Committee. I’m writing as a Virginia voter, a parent, and an educator to ask that you oppose the wording of this bill, which clearly targets world language courses: “The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing or robotics in lieu of world language courses or any other required course that the Board deems appropriate.” I certainly understand the need to differentiate educational paths for Virginia students based on their talents, interests, and goals. Creating various curricular paths for students who aspire to the advanced studies high school diploma can serve this goal. However, the wording of HB 340 unnecessarily prejudges the curriculum that might be established by these new pathways and unfairly targets courses that teach skills--communication and cross-cultural awareness--essential to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. When 2100 U.S. Human Resources departments were surveyed, 93% of the respondents said they value employees able to work effectively across a range of different countries and cultures, 66% identified foreign language skills as part of the hiring process, and 41% reported a hiring preference for multilingual applicants. Career and technical education is not in opposition to world languages; the two disciplines can work together to prepare career-ready global citizens. Therefore, I ask that you vote to eliminate the words “in lieu of world language courses” from HB 340. Thank you. Sincerely, Natalia Dudnik

Last Name: Fore Organization: Abingdon High School Locality: Abingdon

I am writing as a World Language teacher and as Vice President of the Virginia Organization of World Language Supervisors (VOWLS) to express my opposition to HB 340, in particular the part that states ‘in lieu of world language courses.’ There is no doubt that CTE courses are a valuable part of students’ education. However, replacing or eliminating the World Language requirement for the Advanced Studies Diploma is not required to support student enrollment in CTE courses. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. World Language courses help Virginia graduates to "build connections and value for interaction with diverse communities," an identified goal of the profile of a Virginia graduate, and teach interpersonal and communication skills essential in any workplace. World Languages and CTE should be encouraged equally to encourage student success in the skills they will need to be successful and productive adults in an ever changing world. I invite you to read the February 2017 report from the American Academy of Arts and Sciences which addresses the needs of investing in language education in the 21st century, demonstrating that learning a World Language "would have real benefits for our personal lives as well as for commerce, security, and diplomacy. Researchers are discovering that language learning, particularly among young children, improves learning outcomes in a variety of other disciplines over a long period of time. New empirical evidence suggests that it also encourages the development of empathy and effective interpretive skills. Bilingualism enhances overall cognitive ability..... and that a greater public emphasis on language education would yield results far greater than any initial financial investments." ACTFL’s Lead with Languages (2018) reports there is a significant shortage of employees who speak another language. 6400 current job postings IN VIRGINIA that require a second language: these range from Data Analysis, Defense, Healthcare, Energy, Translators, Customer Service and Instructors. World Languages do not hinder CTE careers but only can enhance them making students more marketable. I appreciate your consideration and ask you to vote against HB 340 or at minimum remove the ‘in lieu of world languages’ phrasing.

Last Name: Andrews Locality: Radford

I am writing with concern about HB340. I am a Spanish teacher and have been for 33 years. I see the need now more than ever for students to learn a world language. I feel that it is very important for students to have a background in a world language - many colleges and universities require it and it does help when people get into the workforce. I have had many former students tell me that they use their Spanish more than they would have thought. I know that taking a World Language is not for everyone, but I think it is important for as many students as possible to take one in school. I do feel that CTE classes are important as well. I don't understand having the alternative. I hope you will reconsider pushing through this alternative to world languages for an advanced diploma. Thank you.

Last Name: Williams Organization: VOWLS and FLAVA Locality: Roanoke

I am writing to express my opposition to HB 340, in particular the part that states ‘in lieu of world language courses.’ There is no doubt that CTE courses are a valuable part of students’ education. However, replacing or eliminating the World Language requirement for the Advanced Studies Diploma is short sighted. ACTFL’s Lead with Languages (2018) reports there is a significant shortage of employees who speak another language. This includes many jobs in technology. Our district, Roanoke County Public Schools, has students that qualified for scholarships and jobs in STEM ONLY because they had competency in another language. It is short sighted to trade one competency for another. Schools’ current schedules frequently allow a student to take up to 8 classes a year and there is adequate room in a schedule for both types of courses. A search of indeed.com lists over 6400 current job postings IN VIRGINIA that require a second language: these range from Data Analysis, Defense, Healthcare, Energy, Translators, Customer Service and Instructors. You can see this is not an isolated skill. I appreciate your consideration and ask you to vote against HB 340 or at the least remove the ‘in lieu of world languages’ phrasing. Cammie Williams Supervisor of World Language and ELL Roanoke County Public Schools

Last Name: Staudt Organization: Global Virginia Locality: New Kent County

Virginia Secretary of Education, Aimee Guidera, pledged to ensure that each and every student in the Commonwealth will have a "world class" education. A world class education comprises proficiency in a language other than English, preparing our students to be career ready. Being globally ready starts right here in the Commonwealth, with local language needs in every career cluster. HB340 is asking for alternative pathways for students on the expense of World Language acquisition. I oppose this bill in its current form. There is nothing innovative about the nature of the bill. It is taking us backwards. What we need, and what the Virginia Chamber of Commerce clearly prioritizes on their VA Blueprint 2030, are language skills for all. The Seal of Biliteracy is an option for all students to earn a distinguished credential on their high school diploma, demonstrating language proficiency in a language other than English. What we should be asking for is a bill that would ensure that students who successfully earns a Seal of Biliteracy earns high school credit. Passing a VDOE approved standardized test with intermediate mid proficiency in all modes of communication, should be rewarded with 3 WL high school credits. To this day, there are inequitable practices in awarding high school credit for passing the Seal of Biliteracy. Some divisions award credit by exam others don't. Let's change the language of HB340 and include the Seal of Biliteracy. This would truly serve our students, and ultimately Virginia's economic growth potential.

Last Name: Neumann Organization: All VA Students Locality: Virginia Beach

We are faced with yet another attack on world languages instruction in the Commonwealth. With the ability to communicate in another language at the top of employers' desired skills lists, why would we consider this step backwards? Replacing world language education with something else is not the right way to promote alternate pathways. We can work with the sponsor of this bill to keep world languages as a priority in Virginia while providing access to alternate pathways. Removing the requirement for coursework in world languages, coursework that promotes inclusion, understanding, intercultural competence, and interpersonal skills, would set Virginia back, not move us forward. The Commonwealth needs this valuable 21st century skill to be promoted and expanded.

Last Name: St Clair Organization: Virtual Virginia Locality: Lexington

HB340 At this time, more than ever, we are living in a global economy and our Virginia students deserve a chance to fully engage internationally. As an upper-level French and Spanish teacher for the last 20 years, I have had students double and triple major in math, computer science, economics, finance AND a language. Because of their stellar AP language scores, they were able to add a language major or minor to another field of study in order to be competitive in the multi-lingual global marketplace. Now is the time to encourage all Virginians to become proficient in another language. HB340, does not provide the support that our students need to develop global competencies. Virginia educators and the VDOE have been working tirelessly to promote the benefits of multilingualism with our World Language Governor's School Program and the Virginia Seal of Biliteracy. Students should be challenged to expand their horizons, not limit them. According to the Virginia Economic Development Partnership, in Virginia alone, we have over 1200 international business locations operating within our commonwealth. These international companies come from all over the world and speak a myriad of languages. Do not sell our students short. Their future depends on you! https://internationaldirectory.vedp.org/

Last Name: Aldrich Locality: Harrisonburg City

While I applaud the intent of this bill to elevate the prestige of career and technical education, the devil is always in the details. Virginia's students need both career readiness and global readiness skills to succeed after high school. Please don't diminish the important role of world languages in our students' development. If anything, we need more world language study for both advanced and standard diploma students.

Last Name: Lynne Hendrick Organization: FLAVA Locality: Virginia Beach

I am writing in opposition to HB 340. In a world that is increasingly multilingual and multicultural, we should be encouraging students to study more world languages for longer, not offering ways to avoid learning world languages. I oppose any advanced studies diploma that does not include world language components. The wording of this bill "in lieu of world language courses" unnecessarily prejudices the curriculum that might be established by these new pathways, unfairly targeting courses that teach skills -- communication and cross-cultural awareness -- of use to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. World language courses help Virginia graduates build connections and value for interaction with diverse communities, an identified goal of the profile of a Virginia graduate, and teach interpersonal and communication skills, essential in any workplace. Please do not approve HB340 as it is currently written. Do not intentionally put Virginia students at a disadvantage in both the college application process and in the work world. All of us need the skills learned in our world language classrooms.

Last Name: Sones Locality: Richmond

Hello, I write today in opposition to the current wording of HB340 which unnecessarily targets world language education as part of the high school advanced diploma. Education in world languages provides intellectual and cognitive benefits far beyond the actual language learned. Despite what some think, language learning is accessible to all students, including those with benefits, but should absolutely be a part of any honor or advanced educational program or diploma. World language education is an integral part of Global Readiness standards, 21st Century skills, as well as a core element of all International Baccalaureate programs, including the IB Career Readiness Diploma. The rest of the world understands the importance of communication skills as seen by the requirements of 2nd and 3rd language studies for students in most industrialized countries. Any exclusions of world language learning from the Virginia Advanced Diploma would be a detriment to our students. Thank you for time.

Last Name: Berry Locality: Williamsburg

HB 340 is currently before the House Education Committee. I’m writing as a Virginia voter and an educator to ask that you oppose the wording of this bill, which clearly targets world language courses: “The Board of Education shall establish pathways to the advanced studies high school diploma, and associated diploma seals for students who successfully follow and demonstrate excellence on such pathways, that require advanced coursework in a career and technical education field such as advanced manufacturing or robotics in lieu of world language courses or any other required course that the Board deems appropriate.” I certainly understand the need to differentiate educational paths for Virginia students based on their talents, interests, and goals. Creating various curricular paths for students who aspire to the advanced studies high school diploma can serve this goal. However, the wording of HB 340 unnecessarily prejudges the curriculum that might be established by these new pathways and unfairly targets courses that teach skills--communication and cross-cultural awareness--essential to all Virginians, no matter their career orientation. All Virginians live in a multilingual and multicultural society within a global economy. When 2100 U.S. Human Resources departments were surveyed, 93% of the respondents said they value employees able to work effectively across a range of different countries and cultures, 66% identified foreign language skills as part of the hiring process, and 41% reported a hiring preference for multilingual applicants. Career and technical education is not in opposition to world languages; the two disciplines can work together to prepare career-ready global citizens. Therefore, I ask that you vote to eliminate the words “in lieu of world language courses” from HB 340. Thank you. Sincerely, Cristina Berry

Last Name: Staudt Organization: Global Virginia Locality: New Kent County

In 2017, the US Department of Education developed a framework for Global and Intercultural Competence, in which the need for language proficiency and intercultural competence is clearly outlined. This constitutes an essential commitment to all students, and today, more than ever, we need to prepare all of our students to be career ready to meet local and global demands . Whether hospitality, construction, EMT, police, healthcare or any other career cluster, our Virginia employers are looking not only for technical skills, but global century career skills, which comprise socio-cultural competence and the ability to speak at least one other foreign language. Virginia already offers alternate pathways of learning. What we need is to prepare all students to be globally ready. The Virginia Chamber of Commerce also understands this necessity and prioritizes world language learning Prek-12 in their Virginia 2030 blueprint p.9: Support and expand Dual Language Immersion and the Seal of Biliteracy as seminal pathways toward industry credentialing Emphasize language instruction in earlier grades where children more easily learn other languages Partner with and create internships with multinational companies emphasizing language and technical skills Virginia is already behind our neighboring states, who have invested in world languages studies K-12. Students in Georgia, NC, and SC are graduating multilingual with increased job opportunities and higher starting salaries. I strongly oppose HB 340, as it constitutes a disservice to the students in the Commonwealth.

Last Name: Sones Locality: Richmond City

World language skills are a vital part of 21st Century Skills and global competency for any works, and should be a central part of Virginia's Advanced Diploma. "The ability to communicate with respect and cultural understanding in more than one language is an essential element of global competence.* This competence is developed and demonstrated by investigating the world, recognizing and weighing perspectives, acquiring and applying disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge, communicating ideas, and taking action." ACTFL In the 21st century, language learning meets real world needs: Rewards learners with a resume differentiator – the ability to communicate and collaborate in another language across cultures and time zones Provides access to information and collaboration in any field - including science, technology, engineering, mathematics; business; and health care Develops critical literacies by practicing skills to understand, exchange opinions, and present ideas Develops flexible and adaptable thinking, plus an ability to function in new and unfamiliar situations Prepares learners to think and interact in a global community Language learning develops these 21st century skills as learners: Participate in face-to-face interactions via technology, internships and volunteer opportunities in the community. Apply their competence in a new language to their career and personal goals, broadening their thinking beyond self-serving goals. Become more adept in understanding diverse cultural perspectives and their own identity. I oppose any Advaanced Studies Diploma that excludes world langauges and vehemently oppose the wording of HB340 that seems like a personal vendetta of a particluar sponsor.

End of Comments